RSPCA North Wilts Respond to Urgent Call to Help Rescued Wildlife - RSPCA North Wiltshire
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Cute hedgehog baby in male hand, closeup

RSPCA North Wilts Respond to Urgent Call to Help Rescued Wildlife

Oak and Furrows Wildlife Rescue Centre, on the Gloucestershire/Wiltshire border, has experienced one of its most strenuous periods since it was established over 20 years ago. With the number of patients rising from just over 3,000 to 5,300 in the last 15 months, the charity has been under major financial pressure to cover its running costs.

Last week, RSPCA North Wiltshire’s branch development manager Richard Clowes visited the centre to present a donation of £500 to the struggling charity. Richard tells us “Oak and Furrows Wildlife Rescue Centre recently approached us asking for our charity’s support, The Board of Trustees were unanimous in their decision to help out.” Richard went on to tell us; “ Quite a number of the calls received by our welfare inspector regarding threatened or injured wildlife are passed on to Oak & Furrows who do a wonderful job of rescuing & caring for local animals.”

On his visit to the centre at the Blakehill Nature Reserve, Richard was introduced to some of the patients including a number of the 110 hoglets currently in the care of Oak and Furrows. Hedgehogs are regular visitors to the centre, along with deer, foxes, owls, stoats, squirrels, swans, voles, shrews, bats and any number of other injured, sick or orphaned animals.

This time of year is often tough on animal rescue charities, with increased call outs and greater numbers of patients causing a strain on resources. Richard comments; “It is critical that charities like ours pull together in times of need, particularly when we are working for a shared cause.” A recent monthly report by RSPCA’s Chief Inspector John Atkinson showed the North Wilts area received 39 welfare complaints, with 50 animals being rescued or taken in over the 30 day period.

If you come across injured or abandoned wildlife in your area this winter and are unsure what do to, your local animal rescue charities are on hand to help out, you can seek advice through phoning in and speaking to volunteers or staff or by visiting their websites for more information.

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